Surviving This Holidays Season, Together.

Those sneaky holidays...

The Halloween decorations have been taken down, and now it feels even more real... The Holidays are officially upon us. For some, this magical season might not feel so magical. This year might have brought on changes or losses, and the holidays are just another reminder of a "new normal" that's still hard to accept.

Mix in the emotional anticipation of opening those holiday decorations, knowing full well you're opening boxes of memories. Whether it's an ornament, a stocking, or something special for that someone special, you had no idea what was put away last year would trigger so many emotions in the new one.

If this season brings you heartache while thinking about that significant change, let's do this year together! Let's do it in the spirit of what we learned from losing our beloved pet companion. For this holiday season, let's just take some time to "be". Let's "be with our emotions". Let's feel everything we haven't allowed ourselves to feel over our losses. Let's not only take time to mourn, but to celebrate the time spent together.

Over the next couple of months, The Pet Loss Center will be focusing on Surviving The Holidays Without a Beloved Pet. Make sure to visit our Facebook Page and Website as we mourn and celebrate the best gift we ever had with our precious animals...their presence.

Sincerely,
The Pet Loss Center

#HonoringTheJourney of... Featured Memorial Item

Maggie

"My dear, sweet Maggie, you had such a strong presence that filled the entire house. You were larger than life and had the biggest personality we have ever seen in a dog. You were a sassy, yet very loving, loyal and sweet pup."

Personalized Collage Blanket

Our pet’s unconditional love wraps around us daily. From one picture to a collage of many photos, these one-of-a-kind blankets will not only showcase their beautiful faces, but allows you to hold their love close.Consider adding their special paw print photo to this collage as well, truly making this a distinctive piece sure to delight any pet lover.

Be sure to enter code HONORTHEJOURNEY at checkout to receive 15% off a Pesonalized Collage Blanket!

Visit Our Store

Try These Tricks the Next Time You Have to Give Your Pet Medication

Have you noticed that your pet seems to develop jaws of steel when it's time for a dose of medicine? As you struggle to pry apart your furry friend's teeth, you know you only have one chance to drop the pill in his or mouth or squirt the contents of the dropper full of liquid medication. If you miss that chance, the pill ends up on the floor or the liquid drips down your pet's face. Giving your pet medication doesn't have to be a stressful experience for either of you if try a few of the following tricks.

Hide the Medication

Concealing a pill or liquid medication in food isn't a new trick, but it's one of the easiest ways to get your pet to take medication. If you want to try this sneaky approach, keep these things in mind:

  • Size Matters. Hide the pill or mix the liquid medication in a fairly small piece of food. If you serve your pet a large meal, he or she may never eat the part that contains the pill. Before mixing a medication in food, check with your pet's veterinarian. Some medications are less effective if they aren't taken in their original form.
  • The Stinkier, the Better. Pets can sniff out unusual smells in their food and may reject even favorite treats if they don't smell right. If your pet has foiled your plans in the past, hide the pill or medication in a smelly food, like salmon or a particularly stinky type of soft cheese. Strong food odors will make it easier to ignore that distinctive medicinal smell.
  • Use a Capsule. Consider hiding medications that smell or taste bad in an empty capsule before adding the medicine to food. Once the pill is enclosed in the capsule, your pet won't be able to smell it.

Change the Flavor

Cherry and bubblegum flavors make medications more palatable to young children, but they don't tempt your pet's taste buds. Luckily, compounding pharmacies can add flavors pets enjoy, including beef, fish, chicken, cheese and liver. If the pill or liquid medication tastes good, your pet may accept it willingly.

Make It Easy

A few of these tips may make giving your pet medication less challenging:

  • Distract Your Pet. Give your dog a medication-infused treat during a walk or offer a bite of a tuna-encrusted medication while your cat is mesmerized by the birds outside the window.
  • Keep Him or Her Guessing. Your pet will soon catch on if you only offer a certain treat when it's time for the next medication dose. Give your pet a few treats throughout the day to make him or her more receptive when it's time for the next dose of medicine.
  • Take Advantage of Peer Pressure. Other pets don't like to be left out when you're distributing food. Take advantage of your group's competitive nature by offering the entire gang treats. As the patient hurries to keep up with his or her peers, sneak in the treat that contains the medication.
  • Try the Paw Method. Mix crushed pills or liquid medication with peanut butter or any other sticky food, place it on your pet's paws, and watch him or her lick it off.

When All Else Fails, Place the Medication in Your Pet's Mouth

Despite your best efforts, your pet may refuse to take the pill or liquid. If this happens, you'll need to place the medication in his or her mouth. Tilt your dog's head back, grasp the top jaw between your thumb and index finger and pull up. Gently pry the lower jaw open with your middle and ring fingers and place the pill in the dog's mouth, then stroke his or throat to encourage swallowing. Avoid placing your fingers over the sharp, fang-like canine teeth.

If you're giving a pill to a cat, place your hand over the upper jaw, then tilt the head backward. Many cats will automatically open their mouths at this point, and you can insert the pill. If this doesn't happen, use your middle finger to gently open the jaw, then deposit the pill near the back of the mouth.

A pill gun, a device that shoots the pill into your pet's mouth, is a good option if you're worried that your pet might bite you.

Don't tilt the head back if you're giving a dog or cat liquid medication, as this can cause choking. Aim the dropper to the side of mouth between the teeth and the gums.

Keep your pet healthy with regular visits to the veterinarian. Contact us to schedule your pet's next visit.

Sources

VetStreet: How to Give Your Dog Medication, 1/23/13
http://www.vetstreet.com/dogs/how-to-give-your-dog-medication

PetMD: How to Give Your Pet a Pill
https://www.petmd.com/dog/care/how-give-your-pet-pill

Washington State University: Giving Oral Medications to Your Dog
https://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/outreach/Pet-Health-Topics/categories/procedures/dogs/giving-oral-medications-to-your-dog

Reducing the Spread of Disease When You Have Multiple Pets

What's worse than a sick pet? Three of them! Viruses and parasitic infections can quickly spread among your pets, making them feel miserable. Taking these preemptive steps when one of your furry friends shows signs of an illness can help you protect the health of the entire group.

Determine Who's Really Sick

Pets don't always show obvious signs of illness until they're very sick. The behavior stems from an instinctive desire to hide their illnesses from predators that tend to prey on weak animals. Unfortunately, those instincts may make it difficult to determine who's responsible for the puddle of vomit on your living room carpet or the pile of loose stools on the kitchen floor. Tracking down the culprit can be particularly difficult if your cats share litter boxes and you notice that one of them has developed diarrhea.

If you're not sure which of your pets is sick, separate them for the day. Place each of them in a separate room with adequate food or water. If you have cats or housetrained rabbits, be sure to include a litter box with fresh litter. Cover the floor with paper or wee mats to make clean up simple.

Although placing your dogs in their crates may seem like an easy way to determine which pet is sick, confining your pooches to small spaces may not be the best option if vomit or diarrhea is involved. In addition to cleaning the crate, you may also need to give your pet an emergency bath if he or she vomits or has an accident in the crate.

If you don't have enough room to separate each pet, sniff out the sick animal by process of elimination. Keep one pet in a separate room every day until you find out which of your furry friends isn't feeling well.

Prevent the Illness from Spreading

Whether one of your pets has a virus or a parasitic infection, there are a few things you can do to keep your other pets healthy, such as:

  • Quarantining the Sick Pet. Place your pet in a quiet room stocked with a soft washable bed, food and water. Your pet needs extra attention during an illness. Be sure to make regular visits to the room to check on his or her condition and offer a few reassuring words.
  • Washing Your Hands. Germs can linger on your hands after you pet your furry friend, clean up accidents or scoop the litter box. Wash your hands immediately after contact with a sick pet.
  • Cleaning Bedding. Wash bedding, towels, food and water dishes and other items that your sick pet has touched to prevent the spread of disease. Don't forget to clean brushes too. If one pet has mange, the disease can quickly spread to other pets if you use the same brush to groom them.
  • Using Separate Food and Water Bowls. Provide each pet with his or her own water and food bowl to prevent transmission of diseases through saliva.
  • Finding a New Elimination Spot. Most dogs can't resist sniffing feces. Unfortunately, illnesses and germs can be transmitted when your pets check out a mound of freshly deposited stool. Germs can even linger in the grass after you've picked up stool. If your sick dog is well enough to eliminate outside, take him or her to a new spot far away from the usual elimination area in your yard.
  • Keeping Vaccinations Up to Date. Vaccinations prevent your pets from developing a variety of illnesses, including distemper, rabies, bordetella and influenza. Because it takes a few weeks for your pet to build up immunity after receiving vaccines, it's important to ensure that all of your pets' immunizations are current.
  • Treating Other Pets. In some cases, your other pets may need treatment, even if they display no signs of illness. For example, if one of your pets has tapeworms, chances are that they all do.

Preventing the spread of illnesses and infestations is particularly important if some of your pets are older or are very young. Because these animals tend to have weaker immune systems, it may be more difficult for them to fight off illnesses.

Are you concerned about your pets' health? We offer effective treatments for common diseases and illnesses and can provide immunizations that prevent your pet from becoming seriously ill. Call us to schedule an appointment for all of your furry friends.

Sources

Vet Street: Tips to Living with Multiple Pets, 10/1/12
http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/tips-to-living-with-multiple-pets

PetMD: How to Quarantine Your Pet
https://www.petmd.com/dog/general-health/how-quarantine-your-pet

ASPCA: Common Cat Diseases
https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/cat-care/common-cat-diseases

AVMA: Disease Risks for Dogs in Social Setting
https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/Disease-Risks-for-Dogs.aspx

Pet Blood Donors: Helping Other Animals in Need

Blood transfusions are just as crucial for sick or injured animals as they are for people. Without a ready supply of donated blood, animals may die unnecessarily. Thanks to the generosity of donor pets and their people, animals with severe health conditions or injuries can receive the blood transfusions they need.

When Are Blood Transfusions Recommended??

A blood transfusion may be needed if an animal experiences blood loss due to an accident, ruptured tumor or other cause; has severe anemia; has been poisoned or requires major surgery due to an illness or injury. Although human blood banks can be found in small and large towns alike, pet blood banks aren't quite as common. If there are no blood banks close by, small private veterinary practices or veterinary schools may create their own blood banks.

Can Any Pet Become a Blood Donor?

Ask your pet's veterinarian if he or she thinks your furry friend would be a good candidate for blood or plasma donation. If the veterinary practice you visit doesn't have its own blood bank, the employees may be able to recommend one in the area. In some cases, local veterinarians collect blood for regional blood banks, ensuring that you won't have to travel far if your pet becomes a donor. Dogs and cats aren't the only blood donors. In rural areas, cows and horses may also donate blood.

Before your dog or cat is accepted as a blood donor, the blood bank or your veterinarian will consider these factors:

  • Health. Donors must be in good health and may not take any medications, other than heartworm, tick and flea prevention medication. All vaccinations must also be current. Pets may be prohibited from donating if they have ever received blood transfusions in the past.
  • Blood Type. The blood bank may also consider your pet's blood type when approving new donors.
  • Age. Donation is usually limited to younger pets. If your pet is younger than 1 or older than 8, he or she may not be a good candidate.
  • Personality. Becoming a blood donor isn't a good idea if your pet hates visiting the vet. Forcing a reluctant pet to donate blood can be traumatic and may make the process much more difficult.
  • Weight. Typically, cats must weigh at least 10 pounds and dogs 50 pounds, although weight requirements may vary. Outdoor cats aren't eligible to donate blood.

What Are the Advantage of Blood Donation for My Pet?

Blood banks and veterinary practices may show their appreciation for donor pets by offering free examinations at every donation visit, giving you a copy of the lab analysis performed on the donated blood, informing you of your pet's blood type and offering free services, such as complimentary vaccines or free or reduced-cost veterinary care.

What Happens During the Blood Donation Process?

A small amount of your pet's fur must be shaved in order to allow the needle to be placed in the jugular vein in the neck. Although that sounds a little painful, most pets don't seem to mind the needle. Before donations, cats usually receive a mild anesthetic, as they're less likely to remain still for the donation. If your pet is awake, he or she will receive plenty of attention, and probably a few treats, from the veterinary staff. Some dogs and cats receive intravenous fluids after donations to ensure that they don't experience a drop in blood pressure.

Your local blood bank or veterinarian's office will determine how often your pet can donate blood. Some banks will ask you to bring your pet in for donations every six weeks for a year, while large banks may ask that your pet donate two or three times per year for several years. Donations are needed frequently, as donated blood has a limited shelf life and must be used within approximately one month.

Do you think your pet would make a good donor? Give us a call and we'll help you get the process started.

Sources

Petfinder: Can Your Dog Be a Blood Donor?
https://www.petfinder.com/dogs/dog-health/dog-blood-donor/

Humane Society of the United States: Life-Saves: Dogs Who Donate Blood, 11/20/12
http://www.humanesociety.org/news/news/2012/11/blood_donor_dogs_112012.html

PetPlace: Animal Blood Banks in the U.S., 9/23/15
https://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/pet-health/animal-blood-banks-in-the-united-states/

Taurine: The Amino Acid Essential to Your Cat’s Health

If you've ever taken a close look at the small print on a bag or can of cat food, you've probably noticed that taurine is among the list of ingredients. Taurine is an amino acid that helps keep your pet healthy and prevents a variety of serious health problems.

What Do Amino Acids Do?

Amino acids help the body's cells create proteins needed for the proper functioning of every part of the human and feline body. The acids aid in the metabolic process and play an important role in the transportation and storage of nutrients.

Although many amino acids are produced by the body, some can only be obtained through food. Amino acids that must be obtained through diet alone are known as "essential" amino acids. Although people and dogs can synthesize taurine from other amino acids, cats cannot. If they don't receive enough of this essential amino acid in their food, their health will eventually begin to decline.

How Are Cats Affected If They Don't Receive Enough Taurine?

A taurine deficiency can cause many problems in cats, including:

  • Dilated Cardiomyopathy. The condition causes the heart to enlarge, affecting its ability to pump blood effectively. Cats affected by dilated cardiomyopathy may also develop congestive heart failure as a result of pumping issues.
  • Blindness. A taurine deficiency can cause degeneration of photoreceptor cells in the retina. Unfortunately, once these cells are lost, they can't be replaced.
  • Tooth Decay. Taurine helps your cat's teeth stay strong and healthy. When it's in short supply, cavities are more likely to occur.
  • Reproductive Issues. Cats that don't receive enough taurine may be unable to have kittens.
  • Developmental Concerns. Kittens born to mothers with taurine deficiencies may face growth problems and might be more likely to experience bone fractures.
  • Gastrointestinal Problems: Taurine helps the body produce bile salts needed for fat digestion. Without enough taurine, your pet may develop diarrhea and digestion issues.
  • Hair Loss. Lack of taurine may also affect your furry friend's coat and lead to hair loss.
  • Immune System Disorders. Without enough taurine, your cat's immune system may not function optimally. As a result, your pet might not be able to fight off viruses as easily as healthy cats and may suffer from frequent illnesses.
  • Diabetes. Taurine helps the body regulate blood sugar. Your pet may develop diabetes without sufficient amounts of taurine.
  • Lethargy. Cats affected by the deficiency may appear tired and listless.

In some cases, it may be possible to reverse the effects of a taurine deficiency if your cat is diagnosed in time and begins to receive supplemental taurine. Unfortunately, heart and vision changes aren't reversible.

How Do Taurine Deficiencies Occur?

Eating a diet that doesn't contain taurine is the leading cause of the deficiency. Cats that eat homemade foods or eat a vegetarian or vegan diet are most at risk of developing serious health problems related to a lack of taurine. Although caring pet owners often create special diets in an attempt to help their pets, the diets may actually harm their furry friends.

Taurine supplements will increase your pet's supply of the amino acid, but the supplements may not provide enough taurine to prevent health problems. If you feed your pet a homemade, vegetarian or vegan diet, it's a good idea to share the diet with your pet's veterinarian or a veterinary nutritionist. These professionals can help you tweak the meal plan to ensure that it meets all of your cat's nutritional needs.

Your cat may also be a risk of a taurine deficiency if he or she enjoys sampling your dog's food. Dog food doesn't contain taurine, as dogs can create their own supply of the amino acid. Although your cat may like the taste, a steady diet of dog food is a bad idea. If your cat can't resist chowing down on dog food, feed your dog in a separate room when it's mealtime.

Regular veterinary visits are the key to your pet's good health and help ensure that your cat doesn't suffer the devastating effects of a taurine deficiency. If it's been a while since we've seen your pet, call us to schedule an appointment.

Sources

PetMD: Taurine Deficiency in Cats
https://www.petmd.com/cat/conditions/cardiovascular/c_ct_taurine_deficiency?page=show

Tufts University, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine: Feeding the Homemade Diet, 10/17
http://news.vet.tufts.edu/2017/10/feeding-the-homemade-diet/

Texas A&M University: Cat Food for Thought, 12/01/08
http://vetmed.tamu.edu/news/pet-talk/cat-food-for-thought

Should My Pet Get A Summer Haircut?

A summer haircut may help you feel more comfortable during hot, humid summer weather, but it won't have the same effect on your pet. In fact, cutting or shaving your pet's fur can actually compromise your furry friend's ability to remain cool.

Your Pet's Coat Provides Built-In Climate Control

Although wearing a fur coat in the summer might increase your risk of heat stroke, the same isn't true for your pets. Their coats actually provide a built-in heating and cooling system. During the winter, your dog or cat's fur offers warmth when it lays flat against the body. When temperatures soar, the individual hairs in your pet's coat stand upright, maximizing air flow.

Some breeds, such as Chow Chows, Alaskan Huskies, Sheepdogs, Golden and Labrador Retrievers, Scottish Terriers and Shih Tzus, have double coats that keep them comfortable whether it's warm or sunny or snowing and frigid outdoors. The undercoat, the layer of hair closest to the body, insulates your dog's body during the winter. During the summer, the undercoat prevents your pet from becoming too hot by keeping cooler air next to the skin.

Cutting Your Pet's Hair Isn't the Best Choice

Cutting or shaving your pet's hair interferes with your dog or cat's ability to stay cool. Although you may have the best intentions when you turn on the clippers, your pet may have more trouble regulating heat after a shave or haircut. Shaving can even affect your pet for years to come if hair doesn't grow back again after a shave or grows in an abnormal pattern. The problem is particularly harmful if your dogs' undercoat doesn't grow back completely. Without that protective layer of hair, your dog will have trouble handling both hot and cold temperatures.

Sunburn isn't normally a concern when you have a furry pet - unless you shave or cut their hair. Hair protects their sensitive skin from the rays of the sun, preventing burns and reducing the skin cancer risk. Applying sunscreen before trips outdoors is a must if your dog has thin or shaved hair.

Fur also keeps all sorts of unpleasant things from coming in contact with your pet's skin, such as allergens, insects and lawn care products. Without the protection that hair provides, your pet may be more likely to develop painful rashes or bites after spending a little time in the yard.

Better Ways to Keep Your Dog or Cat Cool

The tips can help your pet stay cool during the dog (and cat) days of summer:

  • Find Shade. Make sure your yard offers plenty of shady spaces if your dog or cat will be spending time outdoors this summer. Although a doghouse may help keep your dog warm in the winter, the small space traps heat in the summer and isn't a good shade option. If you don't have any trees in your yard, a large deck umbrella or a tarp can be used to create a little shade.
  • Offer an Ample Supply of Water. Dogs and cats need to drink more when it's hot. Replenish water bowls frequently when temperatures rise.
  • Limit Exercise During the Hottest Part of the Day. Take your dog for walks during the morning and evening when temperatures are a little cooler.
  • Know When to Bring Your Pet Indoors. If it's too hot and humid for you to spend more than a few minutes outdoors, it's also too hot for your pet. Although panting can help cool your pet, panting isn't as effective during very humid days. Young pets, old pets, and pets with short noses, such as bulldogs, may react more intensely to heat and humidity and will benefit from spending more time indoors.
  • Don't Leave Your Pet in a Parked Car. Every year local newspapers and TV stations run stories about pets that die after being left in hot cars. It only takes a few minutes for temperatures in a car to soar to unhealthy levels, even if you leave the windows cracked. If you can't take your pet to a store or restaurant, it's best to leave him or her at home.
  • Brush Your Pet Often. Brushing removes loose hairs and allows air to circulate freely through your pet's coat.

Allowing your pet's natural cooling system to do its job is the best way to keep your furry friend cool this summer. If you have a question about your pet's health or need to schedule an appointment, please don't hesitate to get in touch with us.

Sources

Safe Bee: Should You Shave Your Dog for Summer? No Way, Vets Say, 5/22/15
http://www.safebee.com/family/should-you-shave-your-dog-summer-no-way-vets-say

Catster: Is Shaving Your Cat Okay? 7/19/17
http://www.catster.com/lifestyle/is-shaving-your-cat-okay

Washington Post: Dogs and Cats Can Usually Deal with the Heat, but Their Owners Must Be Careful, 7/9/12
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/dogs-and-cats-can-usually-deal-with-the-heat-but-their-owners-must-be-careful/2012/07/09/gJQAlOqtYW_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.d595bf9a9275

From Dalmations to Siberian Huskies: How the Big (and Little) Screen Influences Pet Fads

Pottery Barn experienced a run on apothecary tables after "Friends'" character Rachel Green bought one for her apartment in a popular episode of the TV series. Viewers decided that if the table looked good in Rachel's spacious New York apartment, it would be perfect for their own homes. It's not just inanimate objects that become fads. Movie and TV viewers also tend to adopt or buy pets based on the animals they see in their favorite films and programs. Here are a few breeds that have become popular after appearing in a TV show or movie.

German Shepherds

Rin Tin Tin, the German Shepherd star of silent movies in the World War I era, started the first pet fad. Everyone wanted a German Shepherd that was as loyal, smart and brave as Rin Tin Tin. Breeders met the demand for the dogs by overlooking standard breeding practices that ensured that puppies were strong, healthy and conformed to breed standards. As a result, today's German Shepherds are prone to developing heart problems, hip dysplasia, cancer and gastric issues, according to a Dogster article.

Dalmatians

Thousands of people decided that they just had to adopt Dalmatians after viewing the cute, spotted puppies in the film version of "101 Dalmatians." Unfortunately, real life is a lot different than reel life. Dalmatians acquired from breeders, rescue groups, and animal shelters can't perform the same tricks as their on-screen counterparts without hours of training. Within a year after the movie aired, many shelters saw huge increases in unwanted Dalmatians, according to a September 1997 New York Times article.

Collies

Lassie was the kind of dog every family wanted in the 1950s. The collie was the perfect companion to TV's Timmy, regularly rescuing him from difficult situations. Unfortunately, the same type of breed problems that occurred with German Shepherds after the popularity of Rin Tin Tin also happened with collies. As a result of mass production, health and temperament problems increased for some of the dogs.

Siberian Husky

You may not be able to buy a fictional direwolf, but you can purchase or adopt a Siberian Husky, a dog that looks very much like Jon Snow's best friend. In fact, the demand for the breed increased significantly after "Game of Thrones" became a hit TV show. Although Siberian Huskies certainly look impressive, they're not necessarily the ideal dog for everyone. In addition to their positive traits, such as loyalty and friendliness, the dogs are very high-energy and notoriously difficult to train.

Animal shelters soon saw a surge in unwanted Huskies as the show's fans discovered that caring for the dogs was much more difficult than they assumed. "Games of Thrones" actor Peter Dinklage even joined with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals to remind fans that adopting a dog should be a lifelong commitment.

Labradoodles, Cockapoos and Other Mixed Breeds

Certain mixed breeds often become popular after they're seen in the company of actresses or actors. Labradoodles, the result of breeding Labrador Retrievers with standard or miniature poodles, are known for their intelligence and friendliness. Tiger Woods, Jennifer Aniston and Lance Bass are among the stars who've adopted or purchased labradoodles.

Cockapoos, the combination of cocker spaniels and poodles, are also friendly dogs known for their affectionate behavior with family members and strangers alike. They've become a favorite of Lady Gaga, Minka Kelly, Ashley Judd and other celebrities.

Other "designer dogs" include the Goldendoodle (golden retriever and poodle), Chug (chihuahua and pug), Pekeapoo (Pekingnese and poodle), Puggle (pug and beagle) and Yorkipoo (Yorkshire Terrier and toy poodle).

Should You Adopt One of These Pets?

All of the breeds listed above can make excellent pets, as long as you understand the needs, potential health problems and temperament of the various breeds. Although a Siberian Husky might not be the best choice if you live in an apartment, the breed may be a better option if you have a large yard, time for multiple walks a day, infinite patience for training, and an appreciation for the finer qualities of the breed.

Labradoodles make fine family pets, but aren't the best choices if you're hoping to avoid a flare-up of your allergies. Although the breed was initially touted as hypoallergenic, that doesn't seem to be the case. A full-bred poodle or another breed may be a better choice if you're allergic to dogs.

Regular veterinary care is essential no matter what breed of dog you choose. If you've recently added a furry friend to your household, or it's time for your pet's checkup, contact us to schedule an appointment.

Sources

The New York Times: After Movies, Unwanted Dalmatians, 9/14/97
https://www.nytimes.com/1997/09/14/us/after-movies-unwanted-dalmatians.html

Dogster: Breed Fads Are Bad for Dogs
https://www.dogster.com/lifestyle/dog-breed-fads-tibetan-mastiff-pug-saint-bernard-dalmatian-chihuahua-jack-russell-terriers

PETA: Peter Dinklage Asks Game of Thrones Fans to Stop Buying Huskies, 8/15/17
https://www.peta.org/media/news-releases/peter-dinklage-asks-game-thrones-fans-stop-buying-huskies

VetStreet: Meet 18 Designer Dog Breeds, 7/2/16
http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/meet-18-designer-dog-breeds

We’re on Facebook, Google +, and Twitter!

Stay connected to keep up to date with Peaceful Pathways for Pets!

We are thrilled with our new social media pages and the opportunity it affords us to communicate better with you. Our new Facebook, Google+ and Twitter accounts give us the opportunity to share current news, happenings, events, and important information with you. We invite you to "Like" us on Facebook by clicking here.Once you have liked us, you will have access to the latest it will also give you the opportunity to respond to our news and get involved in any events we are participating in.

+1 us on Google!

By keeping you in our Circle on Google+ we can share helpful tips and information, advances in our field, and entertaining news relevant to what we do. Adding us to your Google+ Circle will ensure that we receive any information, photos or updates that you want to share directly with us.
Join the conversation on Twitter!

Additionally, our Twitter account will give you the chance to learn more about us, what we do, and how we are involved in the community. You can follow us on Twitter here to join in the conversation about the latest news.

We know that having access to current information is important to you, and our continuous updates to our personalized social media platforms will be designed to keep you "in the know." We hope that you will check in with us on often to learn about current issues and fun events that we are hosting and involved in. By joining our social online community, you will have access to all of our postings and have the ability to share our posts with your friends. If we post something that you find helpful, feel free to share the post with your friends, neighbors and colleagues.

We look forward to continually growing and educating using online spaces, such as Facebook, Google+ and Twitter.